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to shut down the government, when it was shut down for three weeks when newt gingrich was trying to control bill clinton and his spending, and he is giving up his card. when boehner says we don't have an immediate dead crisis he is giving up his cards. he doesn't want to actually do something about this but likes being speaker. >> neil: they're looking at the next -- the end of this month we're facing yet another potential crisis. they're going to argue that the government could shut down. and this is their attempt to say, we won't brick -- bring it to that pranksmanship because we don't want it on our door step we caused it. but it's going to boomerang on them. they retook the upper hand and now they're giving it away. >> exactly right. sequestration was passed a year and a half ago, part of the plan a year and a half ago. all the republicans had to do is keep their mouth shut and stay out of the way. thank god they did that. here we go again. if they're not going to stand up now, to obama, and this absolute mindless spending, and borrowing and printing, then i have to say, neil
and local government have absolutely been desmated by rising healthcare costs, rising pension benefits they're paying out to retirees. this is the last strom they're paying what is left for snow removal, and they may have to ask for more money. the only silver lininges it forces families to stay home. have that dinner table conversation they might rather not have. they're all stuck in a dark room and can't use electronics. so there's so positives. >> neil: there is that. i'm wondering, this whole first quarter of the year has been buffetted by one storm after another and i'm wondering how it's going to affect the overall economy in terms of gdp and big data we get. will it be slower or is the boom you generally get after something like this make up for it? >> well, again, we still have the head wind from the rise in the payroll tax, which is absolutely affecting consumers. also, gdp will be faked. corporate earnings will be affected be the rising dollar and slow european recovery, if there is a recovery. and when we look at the storms, many in the northeast have fallen othe weekends, the ti
's the principle here. the principle is that the government has come in trying to take over one-sixth of the economy in order to be able to gain control of our lives, and of course it's going to be a mess. what does the government do that is good when it starts interfering with our lives? there are functions for the government. they need to remember what those things are and leave the rest of us alone. >> neil: what they discovered, as you warned -- this is prior to your prayer breakfast meet and greet with the president -- that all of a sudden the goodies would be showcased up front. the problems would be later. the goodies were fewer, the problems many more, and the cost of this potentially much, much hire than the thought. how is all of this rolling out now? >> well, of course the reason that it was done in secret, rather than in a transparent manner in which it was supposed to have been done, is because there are so many bad parts of it. there's so many obligations so many new taxes associated with it. it's incredibly expense simple. it was supposed to lower the cost. it has
ever in washington's story -- this is a big story here. we have a government agency that actually wants to cut its budget. it wants to -- >> neil: bingo. wants to downsize. >> congress won't let them. never seen this before. congress is saying you can't touch your budget. it would be one thing if the postal service were earning profit and they had extra money but we're talking bat government agency, because of the decline in mail volume, losing in the neighborhood of 10 to $12 billion a year. this his the first baby step. >> neil: why was this rejected in part of a bigger thing. it wasn't as if they were just fighting this. do they want a more aggressive approach or were they saying, we about to start from scratch? >> first of all, that's the big problem. you have 535 bosses at the postal service trying to run this thing. and the postal -- postmaster general, good caw, cost cutter, wants to make this work. everytime he has tried to cut spending at the postal service, congress has blocked him. another example. we have literally scores and scores of old post offices in towns where you don
of the president is he seems more interested in the trappings and fun stuff than the governance, which was the job he was hired to do. he has an enormous amount of power. we pay him to do the job. you can say the project process is not sexy or exciting. >> neil: i built a career on it. >> now we're going back and forth. the fact is this is what you law says. he should abide by that. >> neil: well-spoken. thank you very much. i was kidding you about your favorite days but i'm worried. >>> fair and balanced. new york democratic congressman charly wrangle doesn't agree with a thing he said, which is okay. >> listen, only if you're fair and equal. forget the brackets. i'm here for the budget. >> he's late. it's routine policy in washington for things to be late. i guess we get used to this. but should we? >> well, let me make it clear that once the budget is passed, it has no meaning at all in the law. and so that there's no compulsion for anyone to do anything if, and i hope soon, there's agreement to the budget. a budget is really a statement of policy of the party. and hopefully in the future, we w
congress passed legislation last september allowing the government to sell space memorabilia, a major auction is now taking place. next monday, 250 space artifacts are going to be up for bids. there are space suits, gloves, photos, emblems, flags, and items valued ate a few hundred dollars, some 100,000, remember when tom hanks played jimmy lovell and counted by hand? you can now bid on page of those hand written notes, although invaluable to the crew whose lives they safe they have an estimated worth of between 50 and $90,000, and also up for bid dehydrated potato soup from the vision. one of most expensive items, the space magna carta. the document signed by u.s. and uss astronauts, symboling the symbolic end of the space race. >> and looking at something that might beatle less pricey, there's a baseball hat from the recovery crew of apollo 15. the amount is $500. >> neil: how many do they expect to participate in this? obviously given the 40th 40th anniversary of apollo 17, last flight to the moon, but who are the folks, how many of the folks who are going out for the auction and b
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6